Indian Mill Creek News

Indian Mill Creek News

Indian Mill Creek News

Indian Mill Creek Clean Up

posted June 05, 2017 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

The Friends of Indian Mill Creek, along with volunteers from C.A. Frost and GR West Catholic High School set out May 20, 2017 to clean up the Indian Mill Creek between Bristole Ave. and Walker. More than 15 bags of trash were removed and many items too large to move, were located and recorded for removal. Several tires were removed from the creek in addition to various building materials and various trash items. We want to extend our thanks to our wonderful volunteers and look forward to our next clean up event!

Friends of Indian Mill Creek Meeting Agenda, Minutes, and Powerpoint Presentation

posted February 16, 2017 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

Friends of Indian Mill Creek Meeting February 8, 2017 Please find below the meeting agenda, minutes, and powerpoint presentation. Agenda Minutes PowerPoint Presentation

Friends of Indian Mill Creek Meeting 2/8/2017

posted February 14, 2017 under: LGROW News Blog Indian Mill Creek Blog

Friends of Indian mill Creek had a meeting on February 8, 2017 at Richmond Park Pavilion from 4.30 to 6 pm. Various topics were discussed, including the Grand Valley State University research on Indian Mill Creek and potential logo designs. Representatives from the City of Walker, City of Grand Rapids, Alpine Township, and several other organizations attended the meeting.

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Friends of Indian Mill Creek meeting on August 9

posted August 29, 2016 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

The Friends of Indian Mill Creek Watershed group met on August 9, 2016, at the DeVos Center for Scouting in Walker to discuss the current condition of Indian Mill Creek. Representatives from different organizations within the watershed and several concerned citizens attended the meeting. Matt Hogg, representing the Boy Scouts of America, and Wendy Ogilvie, from the Grand Valley Metro Council, welcomed everyone and reviewed some facts and challenges of the Creek. Rajesh Sigdel, a Grand Valley State University Graduate Assistant working with GVMC, and Aaron Parker from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, are conducting studies in the Creek and they described their sampling techniques and preliminary results. Attendees at the meeting provided input on what they valued about the watershed, what their greatest concerns were, who else should be involved as partners, and what data they know of that has been collected. Kristine Bersche, Environmental Education Coordinator at the Grand Valley Metro Council, discussed several options for education and awareness activities, including the Mayors’ Cleanup, on September 10th, which attendees were encouraged...

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Sampling at Indian Mill Creek on June 28

posted July 11, 2016 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

 

 

 

Sampling at Indian Mill Creek

posted June 22, 2016 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog LGROW News Blog

Next Wednesday, June 28, 2016, Rajesh is going to collect samples at five stations in the Indian Mill Creek with Professor Richard Rediske and Amanda McCarthy from Annis Water Resource Institute. They will be measuring discharge, setting up scour chains and erosion pins, and conducting macro-invertebrates surveys. Erosion pins are used to measure bank erosion and scour chains measure the scouring of the stream bed. Macroinvertebrates, especially insects like caddisflies and stoneflies, are used as a bio-indicator. They tell us whether the creek is polluted

Pressure Transducers at Indian Mill Creek

posted June 20, 2016 under: LGROW News Blog Indian Mill Creek Blog

We are installing pressure transducer in three locations at Indian Mill Creek; one at north of Richmond Park, Second at Walker Ave intersection and third at Boys scout property. A pressure transducer is used to measure flow in streams. The equipment consists of a 5 ft piece of 2” PVC pipe that is buried 1 ft into the sediment and secured with a metal stake. The instrument inside this pipe measures the atmospheric pressure. The top has a lock to protect the instrument. The transducer is placed in a vertical PVC pipe in the stream bottom to measure the flow.

Friends of Indian Mill Creek Meeting on May 24

posted May 26, 2016 under: LGROW News Blog Indian Mill Creek Blog

Friends of Indian Mill Creek had their second meeting on May 24, 2016. The meeting was held in CA Frost Environmental Science Academy from 4:30 to 5:30 pm. Representatives from Blandford Nature Center, City of Grand Rapids, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Quiet Water Society, West Michigan Environmental Action Council, CA Frost School, Boys Scout of America, and citizens within the Indian Mill Creek watershed attended the meeting. Wendy Ogilvie welcomed everybody and attendees introduced themselves. Previous meeting minutes were discussed,facts and challenges of Indian Mill Creek, and the activities that were prioritized: water quality monitoring, creek clean up events, and education and awareness. Rajesh Sigdel, the GVSU Graduate Assistant working with GVMC, updated the participants about his project. Professor Richard Rediske and Amanda McCarthy from GVSU joined Rajesh in sampling Indian Mill Creek atn 5 locations from the Creek’s headwaters to its mouth. They sampled bed load, monitored water velocity, and measured Total Suspended Solids at each station. The samples were taken ito the lab at Annis Water Resource Institute in Muskegon...

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Measuring Toxicity of Indian Mill Creek

posted May 18, 2016 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

Stormwater runoff from paved streets and parking lots picks up trash, chemicals, and oils that can impair our streams and rivers. We are examining the stormwater to find out if the water is toxic to fish populations through a bioassay Microtox assessment, which is a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tool. We use marine bacteria called Vibrio Fischeri to detect if the water is toxic. The bacteria are non-pathogenic and emit light during their metabolism process. When its metabolism process is affected by toxins, it emits less light. We will have two types of samples. A reference (control) sample will be collected in the upstream area of the watershed and the experimental water sample from Richmond park to compare conditions. The light output at a specific time by the bacteria to a water sample is compared with the control sample to calculate the relative toxicity.

Monitoring stream bank erosion with Erosion Pins

posted April 21, 2016 under: Indian Mill Creek Blog

(One of) The cause for the degrading fish community in Lower section of the Indian Mill Creek is assumed to be due to bank erosion. We are installing erosion pins in five locations of Indian Mill Creek to find out if this is the cause for the impairment. Erosion is the action of rain water that removes the soil. It is a natural process. However, human actions have accelerated the process in many areas. In Indian Mill Creek, we assumed that due to loss of riparian vegetation, this process might have been accelerated. Erosion pins are metal rods set into the banks of rivers. It is very simple and common methods for measuring stream bank erosion. Some portion sticks above the surface and is recorded. The distance between the tops of the pins and the surface are recorded at regular intervals (once a month) for four months starting from Mid-May. Let’s say that you have 10 cm sticking out from the surface when you installed. After a month, 20 cm is sticking out. So, it means that 10 cm of soil has eroded from the bank.

An Agency of the GRAND VALLEY METROPOLITAN COUNCIL